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Kendall County divorce attorney parenting time

The coronavirus pandemic has affected everyone’s life over the past year, albeit in different ways. Although vaccines have started being distributed, there are still restrictions in place, including here in Illinois. Stores, restaurants, and bars are limited to the number of patrons they can have indoors. As a result, many employees in the service industry are working at reduced hours or may even still be furloughed. Those individuals who work in office buildings are likely still performing their jobs remotely from home and utilizing video conferencing technology in place of in-person meetings. Likewise, the majority of students are in a virtual or hybrid learning environment. The consequences of COVID-19 may also be impacting parenting time arrangements for divorced couples. As a parent, it can be challenging to co-parent with your ex-spouse regarding any child-related matter during these uncertain times. Therefore, it is important to work together and understand when a parenting time schedule may need changing in order to maintain your children’s health and well-being.   

What Is Included in a Parenting Plan?

In Illinois, divorcing spouses who have children must create a parenting plan before the divorce decree is finalized and issued. This legal document addresses certain child-related issues, such as who and how decisions will be made regarding their living arrangements, education, religion, and medical care. It is important to note that the term child custody is now referred to as the allocation of parental responsibilities under Illinois divorce law. 

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Kendall County divorce attorney

Making the decision to file for divorce as a parent can be a difficult call to make. You may be worried about the number of ways that this decision will impact your child. Will your child resent you for this choice? Will this damage your child’s relationship with you or his or her other parent? When will I see my child and how will this be determined? These and other types of questions are likely running through your head and may even be holding you back from choosing your own happiness. It is important to remember that all legal decisions regarding your child are made in the child’s best interest, but how is this “best interest” truly determined?

In the Best Interest of the Child

If you and your spouse decide to create your divorce agreement through divorce mediation or collaborative proceedings, you will both get to determine how things will be handled moving forward. This includes designating the primary custodial parent, outlining your parenting plan, and laying out your parenting schedule. After the court reviews and approves your decisions, you will begin to follow the plan that you selected for your child. 

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Elburn parental relocation attorney

It is common for recently divorced individuals to want to start over in a new location. Living in the home that you built with your former spouse can make it difficult to escape your old life and move on to a new chapter. Relocating may finally seem obtainable now that you are free from your marriage, but unfortunately, if you have children, you are never fully independent of your former spouse. With parenting agreements that outline how much you will receive in child support, when each parent will spend time with the kids, and who has the most parenting responsibilities, it can seem difficult to get the space you desired when you filed for divorce. Moving away with your kids may appear to be the solution to a fresh start, but restrictions on relocation may keep you from doing so.

What Is Considered Relocation?

Moving from one house to another does not necessarily classify as relocation. Illinois law outlines how far is “too far” and provides information about how to gain permission to relocate, even if your children’s other parent is not on board. According to Illinois legislation, those who live in DuPage, Cook, Kane, Will, Lake, or McHenry counties and move their children 25 miles from their previous residence are considered to be “relocating.” If you do not live in one of these counties, you have a 50-mile radius to stay within in order to avoid needing permission to move. For those looking to move outside of Illinois, anything further than 25 miles from their previous residence is considered relocating.

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